Full Moon Atlas ⚪ Lunar Crater Catalog [D]

Craters on Earth’s Moon beginning with the letter D.

Return to The Full Moon Atlas and Crater Catalog

FEATURE NAMELATLONDIA (KM)NAME ORIGIN
D'Alembert
50.8N
163.9E
248
Jean-le-Rond ~ (1717-1783), French mathematician and astrophysicist; a friend of Lagrange (q.v.), he published "d'Alembert's principle" in Traité de Dynamique (1743), which was a powerful new interpretation of Newton's Third Law. He also studied physical astronomy, in which he solved the precession of the equinoxes, and was the first to find and solve the wave equation.
d'Arrest

2.3N

14.7E

30

Heinrich Ludwig ~ (1822-1875), German astronomer; discovered 342 N.G.C. objects, mainly with an 11-inch refractor. As a graduate assistant at Urania Observatory, Berlin, he was working with Johann Gaul (q.v.) on the night that Neptune was discovered.
d'Arsonval

10.3S

124.6E

28

Jacques Arsene ~ (1851-1940), French physicist; a pioneer in electrotherapy, he studied the use of high-frequency currents in medical applications. Among his inventions were dielectric heating and various measuring devices, including the thermocouple ammeter and moving-coil galvanometer, which helped establish the science of electrical engineering. The galvanometer, which he invented in 1882 for measuring weak electric currents, became the basis for almost all panel-type pointer meters.
Daedalus

5.9S

179.4E

93

Greek mythological character; a skilled craftsman and inventor, he helped Minos' daughter elope with Theseus. Minos punished him by imprisoning him and his son, Icharus (q.v.), in the Labyrinth. Daedalus made two pairs of wings from feathers, wax and thread. He and Icharus flew from the Labyrinth, but Icharus flew too close to the sun and his wings melted. He plunged into the sea and died.
Dag

18.7N

5.3E

0

Scandinavian male name.
Daguerre

11.9S

33.6E

46

Louis ~ (1789-1851), French artist, photographer and chemist; developed the pioneering method of photograph processing known as "Daguerreotype."
Dale

9.6S

82.9E

22

Sir Henry Hallett ~ (1875-1968), British physiologist; shared the 1936 Nobel Prize in medicine with Otto Loewi (q.v.) "for their discoveries relating to chemical transmission of nerve impulses."
Dalton

17.1N

84.3W

60

John ~ (1766-1844), British chemist and physicist; the first to provide a scientific description of color blindness (1794), a condition from which he suffered and which was long referred to as "Daltonism."
He recorded over 200,000 observations of the atmosphere in his notebooks, and studied mixed gases and the expansion of gases under heat; Dalton's Law is still used to describe the law of partial pressures in chemistry. This work led him to his most important theoretical contribution to chemistry, a scientifically grounded atomic theory of matter.
Daly

5.7N

59.6E

17

Reginald Aldworth; Canadian geologist (1871-1957); served as an instructor in geology at Harvard (1898-1901), from which he had received his M.A. (1893) and Ph.D. (1896), following which he began a six-year stint as field geologist with the Canadian International Boundary Commission.
Daly taught physical geology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1907-1911, then accepted the position of Sturgis-Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard, which he retained until his retirement in 1942.
Damoiseau

4.8S

61.1W

36

Baron Marie Charles Théodore de ~ (1768-1846), French astronomer.
Daniell

35.3N

31.1E

29

John Frederick ~ (1790-1845), British physicist, chemist, educator and meteorologist; first professor of chemistry and meteorology at the then-new King's College of London (1831-1845).
Devised the first two-fluid class battery (1836), the first battery that produced a constant reliable source of electrical current over an extended period of time. His research also led to the invention of a dew-point hygrometer (1820) that measured relative humidity and later became a standard instrument.
Danjon

11.4S

124.0E

71

Andre Louis ~ (1890-1967), French astronomer; devised a method to measure "Earthshine" on the Moon using a telescope in which a prism split the Moon's image into two identical side-by-side images.
By adjusting a diaphragm to dim one of the images until the sunlit portion had the same apparent brightness as the earthlit portion on the unadjusted image, he could quantify the diaphragm adjustment, and thus had a real measurement for the brightness of Earthshine. He recorded the measurements using his method (now known as the Danjon Scale, on which zero equates to a barely visible Moon) from 1925 until the 1950s.
Dante

25.5N

180.0E

54

Durante Alighieri, or ~ (1265-1321), Italian nobleman, philosopher and poet; his lasting contributions to literature include Purgatorio, Paradiso Inferno, Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy), Vita nuova (New Life), Convivio (The Banquet), Rime (Rhymes) and Il Fiore (The Flower).
Darío

11.3S

90.7E

19

Rubén ~, nom de plume of Felix Rubén Garcia Sarmiento (1867-1916), Nicaraguan author, poet, journalist, and diplomat; his first collection of poetry, Azul (1888) won him acclaim throughout South America. His most notable collection, Prosas Profana y Otros Poemas (Profane Prose and Other Poems), was published in 1896. Poema del Otono (1910) is often considered Darío's finest piece.
Darney

14.5S

23.5W

15

Maurice ~ (1882-1958), French astronomer.
Darwin

20.2S

69.5W

120

Charles ~ (1809-1882), British natural scientist;
following a five-year scientific journey along the coast of South
America, and especially on the Galápagos Islands, he published his
observations in A Naturalist's Voyage on the Beagle (1839).
Darwin, reflecting on his observation, developed a theory of
evolution. According to this theory, individual variability means
that some organisms have a slight advantage over others. The
advantage will allow the organisms to compete better in the
"struggle for existence" and produced more offspring,
which will inherit the advantageous qualities. Darwin called the
process "natural selection," whereby favorable traits in
the most "fit" animals allow them to survive and
reproduce.
Das

26.6S

136.8W

38

Amil K. ~ (1902-1961), Indian astronomer.
Daubrée

15.7N

14.7E

14

Gabriel-Auguste ~ (1814-1896), French geologist; his
brilliant experimental researches at Strasburg and later at Paris
served to make him famous in the annals of geology. They comprised
the artificial production of minerals, the geological action of
superheated aqueous vapor, the effect of mutual abrasion, and the
influence of pressure and strain in mountain-making. From 1857-1861
he made a detailed study of the hot springs of Plombières,
observing the chemical action of thermal waters. In 1861 he was
admitted to the Académie des Sciences and succeeded Cordier (q.v.)
as professor of geology at the Museum of Natural History in Paris
and as curator of collections; to the latter he made extensive
additions, particularly of meteorites. Daubréelite (CrS), a grayish
granular mineral found in meteoric iron, was named after him.
Davisson

37.5S

174.6W

87

Clinton Joseph ~ (1881-1958), American physicist;
while working as a research physicist for Bell Telephone
Laboratories (New York), he was awarded the 1937 Nobel Laureate in
physics, along with Sir George Paget Thomson, "for their
experimental discovery of the diffraction of electrons by
crystals." His fundamental work was the foundation for much of
today's solid-state electronics.
Davy

11.8S

8.1W

34

Sir Humphry ~ (1778-1829), British chemist and physicist;
proved that it was not using two different metals that made the
"Voltaic Pile" work; the electricity was actually caused
by the chemical reaction caused by the cloth soaked in brine that
Volta (q.v.) had used to increase conductivity. Davy was able to
create an electric current from the same metal in two different
fluids with the metal in each fluid touching. Davy also used the
Voltaic Pile to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen, and used
the same method to decompose several compounds which led to his
discovery of several new elements.
Dawes

17.2N

26.4E

18

Reverend William Rutter ~, R.A.S. (1799-1868), British
theologian, physician and astronomer; moved to Liverpool in 1826
where he was to meet William Lassell (q.v.) with whom he struck up a
lifelong friendship. In 1829, Dawes took up astronomy and the study
of binary stars in earnest. Sir John Herschel (q.v.) was to become
Dawes' friend and mentor. Dawes improved on Herschel's own double
star work by introducing refinements to his telescope, a 3.8-inch
Dolland refractor, and as a result was able to make more accurate
observations of binaries. Renowned for his observational prowess, he
was often referred to as "Eagle-Eye Dawes."
Dawson

67.4S

134.7W

45

Dr. Bernhard H. ~ (1890-1960), Argentinean astronomer;
noted variable star observer. For his discovery of Nova Puppis 1942,
he was presented the Nova Award Medal.
De Forest

77.3S

162.1W

57

Dr. Lee ~ (1873-1961), American inventor; as an
independent inventor, he received over 180 patents. His most
important work advanced the field of radio broadcasting, including
his invention of the Audion, a triode vacuum tube incorporating a
filament and a plate, like ordinary vacuum tubes, but also a grid
between the filament and plate; the Audion strengthened the current
through the tube, amplifying weak telegraph and radio signals. De
Forest also developed a feedback circuit to increase the output of a
radio transmitter and produce alternating current, as well as a
method of placing "sound on film" for motion pictures that
became standard in the industry.
De Gasparis

25.9S

50.7W

30

Annibale ~ (1819-1892), Italian astronomer; director
of the Observatory of Naples (Capodimonte) beginning in 1864.
Discovered the asteroids 10 Hygeia and 11 Parthenope.
de la Rue

59.1N

52.3E

134

Warren ~ (1815-1889), British astronomer, scientist
and inventor; a pioneer in celestial photography, he adapted the
wet-plate process to lunar photography and invented a
photoheliograph (1858), the first device to produce good quality
solar pictures. His photographs of a solar eclipse in 1860
demonstrated that prominences observed at the sun's edge are of
solar origin. De la Rue is known also for his research in chemistry,
solar physics, and electrical discharge through gases. Among his
inventions were an envelope-folding machine (1851).
De Moraes

49.5N

143.2E

53

A. ~ (1916-1970), Brazilian astronomer.
De Morgan

3.3N

14.9E

10

Augustus ~ (1806-1871), British mathematician and
astronomer, born in India; the first person to define and name
"mathematical induction" and developed De Morgan's Rule to
determine the convergence of a mathematical series. His definition
of a limit was the first attempt to define the idea in precise
mathematical terms. In addition, he also devised a decimal coinage
system, an almanac of all full moons from 2000 B.C. to 2000 A.D.,
and a theory on the probability of life events which is used by
insurance companies. His most important work, Formal Logic,
included the concept of the quantification of the predicate, an idea
that solved problems that were impossible under the classic
Aristotelian logic.
de Roy

55.3S

99.1W

43

Felix ~ (1883-1942), Belgian astronomer; observed and
recorded more than 5,000 variable stars during his career.
de Sitter

80.1N

39.6E

64

Willem ~ (1872-1934), Dutch astronomer; spent most of
his career at the University of Leiden, where he directed and
expanded the astronomy program. Worked extensively on the motions of
the satellites of Jupiter, determining their masses and orbits from
decades of observations. He redetermined the fundamental constants
of astronomy and determined the variation of the rotation of Earth.
He also performed statistical studies of the distribution and
motions of stars, but is best known today for his contributions to
cosmology. Awarded the 1931 Bruce Medal.
de Vico

19.7S

60.2W

20

Francesco ~ (1805-1848), Italian astronomer and
mathematician; as director of the observatory of the Collegio Romano,
he discovered the comets 54P/de Vico-Swift (1844) and
122P/de Vico (1846).
De Vries

19.9S

176.7W

59

Hugo M. ~ (1848-1935), Dutch botanist; best known for
his studies on mutations. As professor of botany at the University
of Amsterdam, he was one of the three scientists who independently
rediscovered and confirmed the laws of heredity as presented by
Gregor Mendel (q.v.).
Debes

29.5N

51.7E

30

Ernest ~ (1840-1923), German cartographer; creator of
legendary maps, including a well-known atlas of the Moon.
Debye

49.6N

176.2W

142

Petrus Josephus Wilhelmus ~, or Peter "Pie"
~ (1884-1966), Dutch physicist and chemist; his first major
scientific contribution (1912) was the application of the concept of
dipole moment to the charge distribution in asymmetric molecules,
developing equations relating dipole moments to temperature,
dielectric constant, etc. In consequence, molecular dipole moments
are measured in debyes, a unit named in his honor. Also in
1912, he extended Albert Einstein's (q.v.) theory of specific heat
to lower temperatures, using Max Planck's (q.v.)  quantum
concept. in 1913, he extended Niels Bohr's (q.v.) theory of atomic
structure, introducing elliptical orbits, a concept also introduced
by Arnold Sommerfeld (q.v.). In 1914-1915, he calculated the effect
of temperature on X-ray diffraction patterns of crystalline solids
with Paul Scherrer. In 1923, with his assistant Erich Hückel, he
developed an improvement of Svante Arrhenius' (q.v.) theory of
electrical conductivity in electrolytic solutions. Awarded the 1936
Nobel Prize in chemistry "for his contributions to the study of
molecular structure," primarily due to his work on dipole
moments and X-ray diffraction.
Dechen

46.1N

68.2W

12

Ernst Heinrich Karl von ~ (1800-1889), German geologist,
mineralogist and cartographer; as director of the Prussian state
mining department, he furthered the development of mining and
metallurgical works in Westphalia and northern Europe. Authored
numerous books on geology and mining, and published a geological map
of Germany.
Defoe

6.0S

80.5E

18

Daniel ~, born Daniel Foe (c. 1661-1731), British author;
considered the founder of the English novel. Author of Robinson
Crusoe,
he produced about 200 works of nonfiction prose in
addition to nearly 2,000 short essays.
Delambre

1.9S

17.5E

51

Jean-Baptiste Joseph ~ (1749-1822), French
mathematician, astronomer and author; in 1771, he tutored the son of
M. d'Assy, the Receiver-General of Finances; in 1788, d'Assy built
an observatory for Delambre, in which he composed his Tables du
Soleil, de Jupiter, de Saturne, d'Uranus et des satellites de
Jupiter
(1792). He served at the Bureau des Longitudes from 1795
and measured the arc of the meridian extending from Dunkirk to
Barcelona. In 1807, Delambre was appointed to the chair of astronomy
at the Collège de France in Paris, and also served as treasurer to
the Imperial University from 1808.
Delaunay

22.2S

2.5E

46

Charles-Eugene ~ (1816-1872), French astronomer;
published the most comprehensive lunar theory of his time, a
two-volume treatise spanning 1800 pages. Delaunay took nearly 20
years to perform his calculations, which were published in 1860 and
1867.
Delia

10.9S

6.1W

2

Greek female name.
Delisle

29.9N

34.6W

25

Joseph-Nicolas ~ (1688-1768), French astronomer;
proposed that the series of colored rings sometimes observed around
the Sun is caused by diffraction of sunlight through water droplets
in a cloud. He also worked to find the distance of the Sun from the
Earth by observing transits of Venus and Mercury across the face of
the Sun. Lived for 22 years in Russia, where he was the founder of
the Petersburg Observatory.
Dellinger

6.8S

140.6E

81

John Howard ~ (1886-1962), American physicist and
radio pioneer; from 1907 to 1948, he held successive posts at the
National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C., including
physicist; chief, radio section; and chief, Central Radio
Propagation Laboratory. During 1928-1929, he was also chief engineer
of the Federal Radio Commission. He served as a representative of
the United States Department of Commerce on the Interdepartment
Radio Advisory Committee from 1922 to 1948; and as a representative
of the United States at numerous international radio conferences.
Dellinger was appointed vice-president of the International
Scientific Radio Union in 1934. In 1950 he became chairman of Study
Group 6 on Radio Propagation of the International Radio Consultative
Committee. He was appointed chairman of the Radio Technical
Commission for Aeronautics in 1941, and held the same position on
the Radio Technical Commission for Marine Services beginning in
1947.
Delmotte

27.1N

60.2E

32

Gabriel ~ (1876-1950), French astronomer.
Delporte

16.0S

121.6E

45

Eugene J.; Belgian astronomer (1882-1955); the celestial sphere is divided according to a plan he prepared (Delimitation Scientifique des Constellations) in 1930, with the boundaries fixed by the International Astronomical Union along lines of right ascension and declination.
Deluc

55.0S

2.8W

46

Jean Andre ~ (1727-1817), Swiss businessman, geologist
and meteorologist; made numerous scientific excursions in the Alps,
on whose natural history he became an authority. Deluc held the
doctrine of catastrophism to explain present geological formations,
opposing the view that present processes acted continuously during
past ages.
Dembowski

2.9N

7.2E

26

Baron Ercole ~ (1815-1881), Italian astronomer and
nobleman; noted astronomer of Milan and a famous observer of double
stars.
Democritus

62.3N

35.0E

39

~ of Abdera (460-370 B.C.E.), Greek astronomer and philosopher;
educated by the Magi in astronomy and theology, he argued the
eternity of existing nature, of void space, and of motion. He
acquired fame with his knowledge of natural phenomena and predicted
changes in the weather, using this ability to make people believe
that he could predict future events.
Demonax

77.9S

60.8E

128

~ (?-c. 100 B.C.), Greek philosopher, born in Cyprus;
among the most popular philosophers of his time, he attempted to
revive the philosophy of the Cynic School in Athens.
Denning

16.4S

142.6E

44

William F. ~ (1848-1931), British astronomer;
legendary comet and meteor shower observer. First to confirm
observation of several prominent meteor showers, including the Iota
Aquarids (1877), Phi Sagittariids (1917) and Tau Herculids (1918).
Desargues

70.2N

73.3W

85

Girard ~ (1591-1661), French nobleman, mathematician
and engineer; invented a new, non-Greek system of doing geometry,
now called 'projective' or 'modern' geometry. Desargues was a member
of the part of the Parisian mathematical circle surrounding Marin
Mersenne, which included Rene Descartes, Etienne Pascal and his son,
Blaise Pascal (qq.v.).
Descartes

11.7S

15.7E

48

René ~ (1596-1650), French mathematician, physicist
and philosopher; developed a theory known as the mechanical
philosophy. In Traité de l'homme ("Treatise on
Man," 1664) and Passions de l'âme ("Passions of
the Soul," 1649), he expounded the view that an animal was an
automaton lacking both sensation and self-awareness, and that only
man was endowed with a soul. His La géométrie includes the
first application of algebra to geometry from which we now have
Cartesian geometry.
Deseilligny

21.1N

20.6E

6

Jules Alfred Pierrot ~ (1868-1918), French selenographer.
Deslandres

33.1S

4.8W

256

Henri Alexandre ~ (1853-1948), French astrophysicist;
worked at the Paris and Meudon Observatories, directing the latter
(1908-1926) and, subsequently, both for three years after their
merger. Made significant contributions to the investigation of
molecular spectra, finding empirical laws that became more useful
after the development of quantum mechanics. He named plages and
filaments, and he showed that the latter are the same structures as
prominences. Awarded the 1921 Bruce Medal.
Deutsch

24.1N

110.5E

66

Armin J. ~ (1918-1969), American astronomer; developed
the method of Doppler tomography, an indirect imaging technique used
in observing the periodic brightness variations of stars.
Dewar

2.7S

165.5E

50

Sir James ~ (1842-1923), British chemist; best known
for his work on the properties of matter at very low temperatures
and the liquefaction of gases. He liquefied and solidified hydrogen
and invented the Dewar flask, a container for storing hot or cold
substances such as liquid air. It consists of two flasks, one inside
the other, separated by a vacuum. The vacuum greatly reduces the
transfer of heat. The common thermos bottle is an adaptation of the
Dewar flask.
Diana

14.3N

35.7E

50

Roman goddess of wild animals and the hunt;
counterpart of Greek goddess Artemis (q.v.).
Diderot

20.4S

121.5E

20

Denis ~ (1713-1784), French philosopher and critic;
best known for his work on the monumental Encyclopédie
(1745-1772), one of the seminal works of Enlightenment thought. He
and his fellow Encyclopedists were notorious for their radical and
often atheistical thought.
Dionysius

2.8N

17.3E

18

St. Dionysius the Areopagite
(A.D. 9-120), Greek theologian and astronomer; one of the first
Athenian disciples of the Apostle Paul and the first bishop of
Athens. A number of works (including The Divine Names, Mystical
Theology, The Celestial Hierarchies,
and The Ecclesiastical
Hierarchy
) are often attributed to him which have influenced
basic Orthodox teaching.
Diophantus

27.6N

34.3W

17

~ of Alexandria (c. 200-c. 284?), Greek mathematician;
often known as the 'father of algebra', is best known for his Arithmetica,
a work on the solution of algebraic equations and on the theory of
numbers. The Arithmetica is a collection of 130 problems
giving numerical solutions of determinate equations (those with a
unique solution), and indeterminate equations. The method for
solving the latter is now known as Diophantine analysis.
Dirichlet

11.1N

151.4W

47

Johann Peter Gustav Lejeune ~ (1805-1859), French-German mathematician;
his work on units in algebraic number theory Vorlesungen über
Zahlentheorie
(published 1863) contains important work on
ideals. He also proposed the modern definition of a function (1837).
Dirichlet is also well known for his papers on conditions for the
convergence of trigonometric series and the use of the series to
represent arbitrary functions.
Disney

18.5N

4.75E

3

Walter Elias ~ (1901-1966), American artist, cartoonist, animator, motion picture producer and entrepreneur.
Co-founder of Disney Brothers Studio and co-creator of Mickey Mouse and other iconic animated characters.
Dobrovolski

12.8 S

129.7E

38

Georgi Timofeyevich ~ (1928-1971), Soviet aeronautical engineer,
air force pilot and cosmonaut, born in Ukraine; following a
successful mission aboard Soyuz 11, which included a
rendezvous with the Salyut 1 space station, Commander
Dobrovolski died with crewmates Vladislav Volkov and Viktor Patsayev
(qq.v.) when a minor malfunction in a door seal caused the cabin to
depressurize prior to reentry. The Dobrovolski Solar Observatory at
Auckland, New Zealand, was named in his honor.
Dörffel,

or Doerffel

69.1S

107.9W

68

Georg Samuel ~ German astronomer (1643-1688); studied
and worked under Erhard Weigel (q.v.) at Jena, along with Gottfried
Kirch. Following Kirch's discovery of the Comet Of 1680, Dörffel
made his own observations and devised his theory of parabolic orbits
for comets.
Dollond

10.4S

14.4E

11

John ~ (1706-1761), British optician; inventor of the
achromatic lens for telescopes. His sons, Peter and John, continued
the family optics business and sold a variety of scientific
instruments.
Donati

20.7S

5.2E

36

Giovanni Battista ~ (1826-1873), Italian astronomer; a
pioneer in the spectroscopic study of the stars and the Sun, he
served as director of the Florence Observatory from 1864. He was the
first to obtain and analyze the spectrum of a comet, concluding that
the composition of comets is, at least in part, gaseous. He
discovered six new comets, among them Donati's Comet, which he first
saw on 2 June 1858.
Donna

7.2N

38.3E

2

Italian female name; literally "woman."
Donner

31.4S

98.0E

58

Anders ~ (1873-1949), Finnish astronomer; professor of
astronomy and director of the Helsinki University observatory.
Doppelmayer

28.5S

41.4W

63

Johann Gabriel ~ (1671-1750), German mathematician,
astronomer; created the Atlas coelestis, an early
cosmologic atlas which included ten star maps and a long series of
diagrams that show the motion of the bodies of the solar system.
Doppler

12.6S

159.6W

110

J. Christian ~ (1803-1853), Austrian physicist and
mathematician; theorized that sound waves from a moving source would
be compressed or expanded, or that the frequency would change (the
"Doppler Effect"). Fizeau (q.v.) generalized Doppler's
work and discovered that it also applied to light. This discovery
contributed greatly to proving the Universe was expanding.
Douglass

35.9N

122.4W

49

Andrew Ellicott ~ (1867-1962), American astronomer,
meteorologist and botanist; while working at Lowell Observatory
(Flagstaff, Arizona), he perfected the tree-ring dating method,
which he named "dendrochronology." Douglass wrote a total
of 159 articles, many of which focus upon the cyclic phenomena or
tree-rings.
Dove

46.7S

31.5E

30

Heinrich Wilhelm ~ (1803-1879), German physicist and
meteorologist; often referred to as the father of meteorology, he
formulated meteorological laws of gyration. His major work was The
Distribution of Heat Over the Surface of the Globe
.
Doyle

2.0N

84.5E

32

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan ~ (1859-1930), Scottish
novelist; creator of
"Sherlock Holmes."
Draper

17.6N

21.7W

8

Henry ~ (1837-1882), American physician and astronomer;
made the first photograph of an astronomical nebula, recording the
Great Nebula of Orion on 30 September 1880; the first stellar
spectrum photograph, which he took of Vega in August 1872; the first
wide-angle photograph of a comet's tail; and the first spectrum of a
comet's head, both of these with Tebbutt's Comet in 1881. In
addition, Draper obtained many high-quality photographs of the Moon
in 1863, a benchmark spectrum of the Sun in 1873, and spectra of the
Orion Nebula, the Moon, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and numerous bright
stars. He also invented the slit spectrograph and pushed the state
of the art in photography, instrumental optics, and telescope clock
drives. (Source: Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers)
Drebbel

40.9S

49.0W

30

Cornelius ~ (1572-1633), Dutch alchemist and inventor;
invented a force pump for a fountain, as well as a clockwork device
that could allegedly keep going for one hundred years. While serving
in the Court of England's King James I, he introduced the compound
microscope, a thermometer and a telescope, as well as a still for
obtaining fresh water from brine; wind-powered musical instruments
and toys; an incubator; and a thermostatically-controlled oven. His
most notable invention, however, was an early version of a
submarine.
Dreyer

10.0N

96.9E

61

John Louis Emil ~ (1852-1926), British astronomer,
born in Copenhagen; an assistant at Dunsink Observatory (1878-1882)
before moving to Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, where he
became Director in 1882, where he concentrated on the compilation of
The Second Armagh Catalogue of Stars and what became his most
important contribution to astronomy, The New General Catalogue of
Nebulae and Clusters of Stars
(known commonly as the
"NGC"). In this catalog, which to this day remains the
standard reference used by astronomers the world over, he listed
7840 objects. He followed it with two supplementary Index Catalogues
(1895, 1908) which contained an additional 5386 objects. It is the
order in which they appear in these catalogs that defines the name
of many prominent galaxies, nebulae and star clusters.
Drude

38.5S

91.8W

24

Paul Karl Ludwig ~ (1863-1906), German physicist;
performed pioneering work on the optics of absorbing media and
connected the optical with the electrical and thermal properties of
solids. His well-known textbook on optics, Lehrbuch der Optik,
is considered a standard work on the subject.
Dryden

33.0S

155.2W

51

Dr. Hugh
Latimer ~ (1898-1965), American physicist and engineer; director of
the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) from 1947
until the creation of the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA), for which he served as Deputy Administrator.
Previously, he was Associate Director of the National Bureau of
Standards, where he had served since 1918 in scientific research.
Drygalski

79.3S

84.9W

149

Erich D. von ~ (1865-1949), German geographer, geophysicist
and polar explorer; led the German Antarctic expedition aboard the Gauss
to explore the unknown area of the Antarctic lying south of the
Kerguelen Islands (1901-1903). Despite being trapped by ice for
nearly 14 months, Drygalski and his crew discovered Kaiser Wilhelm
II Land.
Dubyago

4.4N

70.0E

51

Dimitrii Ivanovich ~ (1849-1918), Russian astronomer;
Also Alexander Dmitriyevich ~ (1903-1959), Soviet astronomer;
author of The Determination of Orbits.
Dufay

5.5N

169.5E

39

Jean C. B. ~ (1896-1967), French astronomer; author of
the essential texts Galactic Nebulae and Interstellar Matter
and Introduction to Astrophysics: The Stars.
Dugan

64.2N

103.3E

50

Raymond S. ~ (1878-1940), American astronomer;
professor of astronomy at Princeton University. Discovered Asteroid
508 Princetonia (1903).
Dumas

5.3S

81.7E

16

Alexandre ~ père (1802-1870), French novelist; best
known for The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte
Cristo
.
Dunér,

or Duner

44.8N

179.5E

62

Nils Christoffer ~ (1839-1914), Swedish astronomer,
astrophysicist and Arctic explorer; professor of astronomy at
Uppsala Observatory, Sweden.
Dunthorne

30.1S

31.6W

15

Richard ~ (1711-1775), British astronomer; planned and
funded the building of the observatory at St. John's College,
Cambridge, donating the instruments himself. He carried out
observations of the transits of Venus in 1761 and 1769, and prepared
new lunar tables.
Dyson

61.3N

121.2W

63

Sir Frank Watson ~ (1868-1939), British astronomer;
astronomer royal of Scotland (1905–10) and of England (from 1910).
As director (1910–33) of Greenwich Observatory he greatly expanded
its research activities and inaugurated (1928) the wireless
transmission of Greenwich time. Noted for his study of solar
eclipses, he was an authority on the spectrum of the corona and on
the chromosphere.
Dziewulski

21.2N

98.9E

63

Władysław ~ (1878-1962), Polish astronomer;
professor of astronomy at Batory University in Vilna and Copernicus
University in Torun. The planetarium at Torun is named in his honor.

 

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